January 2015

Despite our current cold snap, Celebrity Dairy’s cold season is still more one of mud than of snow. The season’s crisp clear winter skies often gives spectacular lighting to the landscape – here captured in late afternoon on Thanksgiving Day by our cousin Jewel Sauls.

Looking backward, we didn’t plan it, but 2014 was a big year for projects:

  • Most visible change is the twelve acre pond located across the pasture from the barns. You might enjoy a 30 minute stroll around it on your next visit This pond will support the INCUBATOR FARM we hope to create. site analysis It will provide the water for leased areas around the pond to expand the number and types of farm operations we hope to encourage on our land. We started talking about this one 15 years ago.
  • Our neighbors Susan and Howard Anderson have located EAST BRANCH GINGER here at Celebrity Dairy, and are producing and selling ginger seed from tissue culture. They have expanded into MICRO GREENS as well.
  • Our son, John Bonitz has built a facility for screening and mixing his soil amendment, CELEBRITY DIRT in our incubator farm area. The building is built from concrete “eco-blocks” instead of the traditional pole-barn construction.
  • Brit continues making really good goat cheese and other goat milk products including goat milk gelato AND has almost completed a dry-store and composting building for the goat manure management.
  • Cud-Zu Goat Milk Soap moved to its new home at Celebrity Dairy in a special room off the farm office. Over a year ago Fleming assumed the title of Chief-Goat Milk Soap Maker having graduated from Charlie and Margaret Miller’s Cud-Zu Soap Making School. site information . Fleming is continuing the tradition of olive, coconut, palm and castor oils and goat milk to make the mild and long lasting soap Charlie Miller started twenty years ago. steam cloud She has introduced reprocessing of the trimmings and is experimenting with sheep’s milk soaps.

But “quiet ” doesn’t mean we have nothing to do. In fact we are busy making all the repairs and improvements we didn’t have time for all year.

We typically hear from visitors of the changes since their last visit – but since we live here and experience the changes is small increments, we need to be reminded of just how much has happened.

Your Hosts

Its hard to predict who will meet you – but the trio in this photo are the most likely.

Fleming (right) is one of your hosts. A studio weaver for 30 years, she is responsible for our award-winning goat cheese. She turned the cheesemaking and dairy responsibility over to Brit and is now focused on the Inn. Somehow she still finds time to work her artistic magic making the inn and its food special.

Brit (center) is your other host, and is especially enthusiastic about showing off the goats. A retired engineer who builds and repairs things, he runs the dairy and on occasion is the evening milker. web page monitoring . If it is after 6:00 PM, you may find him out in the barn doing the evening milking. find a domain Under Fleming’s tutelage, he’s also learned how to cook.

Errant goats – such as Kathryn (pictured), but sometimes the whole herd of 80 animals when a gate is left open. As a kid – here nibbling on our oldest redbud tree in July 1998 – Kathryn would routinely leap over 2-3 fences to come greet visitors.  No one goat since Kathryn has had quite her personality.  She is the namesake of one of our guest rooms.

Cats – with a barn come cats.  Some have graduated from the barn, and manage the approaches to the inn.  Friendly in their feline way, they’ll likely ask you to let them into the Inn.  Please don’t – they are all outside cats.

Last, and probably least, are the free range chickens. Their activity provides us incomparable eggs and endless amusement.

Third Sunday Dinner, August 2009

This month’s dinner is a last chance to enjoy the leisure of summer prior to the end of vacations, and the beginning of school.

Chip Smith and his wife Tina Vaughn – owners of Chapel Hill’s Bonne Soiree restaurant will be making their summer seasonal appearance at the Inn, preparing their al fesco (but air-conditioned) take on a french country picnic.

As a special treat, we’ll have Trey Stephenson from Rosenthal Wines here to discuss the wines Tina picked to complement Chip’s menu. While you’re never certain what Chip will end up cooking, Greg Cox’s Mouthful blog has a preview. Tina’s ability to complement Chip’s food with the appropriate wine is even more incredible when you realize that sometimes she only has minutes between when she finds out what a menu item is and when service begins! We’ll see what she and Trey come up with on the 16th.

The Rosenthal connection is due to cheese: Trey was interested in learning something about how cheese is made, Tina suggested he contact us, and (1) he’s going to spend a few days with us at the dairy learning about how its made, and how the flavors develop, and (2) he’ll have something more to say about the pairing of our cheeses with the FABULOUS Rosenthal wines.

A special dinner indeed. Chip & Tina will next be here in December, for a French Christmas Dinner. (Chip is already wondering what he can roast in our fireplace)